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Novels?


AbuSanad_7

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It took me forever to post this. So, me and my friend started thinking of writing novels and it's something new to us.We don't really have that background Cuz we aren't used to writing, It won't be easy I know but we really wanna do this so Plz guys if you have any advice or tip I appreciate it.

P.S we are looking for an artist too :)

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I agree with CasaDeBen.  Your post isn't leaving us with the best first impression of your grammar skills, stop using shortened terms like "Cuz", "Plz" and others (that can be excused in quick chat, but not on a forum post and definitely not in a novel).  Start typing properly and your writing will improve.

 

Don't even consider looking for an artist until you have improved and are able to write a novel.. you will have to be good at describing stuff so the artist can actually draw something based off your novel.

Edited by DEMON
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As mentioned I would eliminate your Twitter words because that is just very annoying to read. If you are actually serious about writing I would suggest the following.

 

1. Read some books on how to lay out a story. The problem most people have is they have a beginning and end in their mind but have no idea how to get there. Learning how to tell a story and how to hit certain beats is extremely important.

 

2. Following up from Step 1, take some writing classes. This will not only teach you some of the basics but it will surround you with like minded people who will critique your writing and offer suggestions.

 

3. Don't write a novel as your first attempt. Seriously start with writing some short stories (1 or 2 pages). This will teach you how to formulate a story, create interesting characters, write dialog etc. A novel is a HUGE undertaking so attempt something smaller first.

 

4. Know that most novels don't have pictures...so I don't really know what you need an artist for.

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With respect, I disagree with the third suggestion a little bit. In fact, I would say start off with a novel. Doing so will give you an appreciation for what flash fiction really is and is about. The formulation of novels and flash fiction pieces is enormously different.

The common suggestions agents and publishers give writers is that you should have an understanding of the genre your story will be set in. This means that you should understand, for instance, how fantasy stories work. For example we could say that by making your characters "too powerful" leaves not much room for crises and other dilemmas. Who could challenge them? Who would? Unless, perhaps, your story was about very powerful beings becoming weaker through some sort of condition or through moral dilemmas?

In school we were taught to always have a plan: main character bios about three-to-five sentences long; minor character bios about three sentences long; a paragraph or two detailing the important parts of the story's plot (beginning, middle, end). If you plan on finishing the novel and sending it to agents you'll also need a "hook".

With that said, I have thrown away what I was taught in favour of making the character bios as long as I like and including details of how parts of the plot causes characters to change over time as well as their history and appearance. This gives you more solid ground on which to build. Additionally, I believe it's sometimes best that you do not plan the plot to the end - or even middle - so that you can enjoy your work as it unfolds. You'll grow to love your characters more that way!

The most important part of telling a story, however, is none of the above. You need a creative mind, adaptive diction and a vocabulary that absorbs the audience's attention. You can't use storytelling like this:

Mary had a little lamb with a white fur coat.

Instead:

Mary had a little lamb whose coat was white as snow.

Yes, it's the nursery rhyme, but it shows my point.

If you're serious about this professionally, get yourself on a creative writing course which will help you learn how words can be constructed into art. For an easy way to get a closer look at this, go read a poem. Once read, write down how each line can be interpreted in different ways. Also look for a local writers group. And, if you're in the UK, look at the Writers and Artists Yearbook.

But the first thing you should work on is your plot. Get one, write it out, maintain an open mind, and understand that every part of your finished manuscript may need to be changed in order for it to be better. It undoubtedly will have to be if you're not writers.

But remember throughout the whole thing that writing is not a chore or a process. It's a passion. You're making people, worlds and events come to life. You can't manufacture that artificially.

Oh and filler. Stories need filler, I'm afraid, else the novel will be finished in under ten chapters or twenty-thousand words - which is very bad. A strong novel will always be above sixty-thousand.

O nd dnt rite lik dis. . .cuz no1 will care m8

Edited by GarryKE
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With respect, I disagree with the third suggestion a little bit. In fact, I would say start off with a novel. Doing so will give you an appreciation for what flash fiction really is and is about. The formulation of novels and flash fiction pieces is enormously different.

The common suggestions agents and publishers give writers is that you should have an understanding of the genre your story will be set in. This means that you should understand, for instance, how fantasy stories work. For example we could say that by making your characters "too powerful" leaves not much room for crises and other dilemmas. Who could challenge them? Who would? Unless, perhaps, your story was about very powerful beings becoming weaker through some sort of condition or through moral dilemmas?

In school we were taught to always have a plan: main character bios about three-to-five sentences long; minor character bios about three sentences long; a paragraph or two detailing the important parts of the story's plot (beginning, middle, end). If you plan on finishing the novel and sending it to agents you'll also need a "hook".

With that said, I have thrown away what I was taught in favour of making the character bios as long as I like and including details of how parts of the plot causes characters to change over time as well as their history and appearance. This gives you more solid ground on which to build. Additionally, I believe it's sometimes best that you do not plan the plot to the end - or even middle - so that you can enjoy your work as it unfolds. You'll grow to love your characters more that way!

The most important part of telling a story, however, is none of the above. You need a creative mind, adaptive diction and a vocabulary that absorbs the audience's attention. You can't use storytelling like this:

Mary had a little lamb with a white fur coat.

Instead:

Mary had a little lamb whose coat was white as snow.

Yes, it's the nursery rhyme, but it shows my point.

If you're serious about this professionally, get yourself on a creative writing course which will help you learn how words can be constructed into art. For an easy way to get a closer look at this, go read a poem. Once read, write down how each line can be interpreted in different ways. Also look for a local writers group. And, if you're in the UK, look at the Writers and Artists Yearbook.

But the first thing you should work on is your plot. Get one, write it out, maintain an open mind, and understand that every part of your finished manuscript may need to be changed in order for it to be better. It undoubtedly will have to be if you're not writers.

But remember throughout the whole thing that writing is not a chore or a process. It's a passion. You're making people, worlds and events come to life. You can't manufacture that artificially.

Oh and filler. Stories need filler, I'm afraid, else the novel will be finished in under ten chapters or twenty-thousand words - which is very bad. A strong novel will always be above sixty-thousand.

O nd dnt rite lik dis. . .cuz no1 will care m8

See the reason I suggested not to write a novel first is because he doesn't have any experience writing at all.

 

The great thing about short stories is you can flesh out a larger story from them. Also it really helps you learn the basics of just creating a coherent story with interesting characters.

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I do understand your point and I agree with you that it's a good idea. But in the way that I see it a short fiction piece is a story of anything from an hour to a day or night. They're short events in a person's life. Whereas writing a full novel will help you understand that you can't narrate the story as you might do in a shorter piece; you have to make it last a lot longer.

But I guess it depends on the person. At least, with both of our suggestions, there are two ways of going about it.

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I am a writer and I have a few suggestions:

  1. Write everyday.
    Whether it is a journal or from story prompts, writing is a much a skill as it is a talent and practice is the only way to improve.
  2. Read often, widely, and diversely.
    A poor reader has never made a good writer.
  3. Observe your surroundings.
    How do people interact? What are their motivations? Why do they react the way they way?

Good luck and work hard.

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Avid reader and occasional writer here!

First off you should try to write something every day. Journaling is a good place to start, or perhaps some small poems or stories to get into the habit.

It's also good if you're a reader and a good people watcher. You want what you write to be believable.

Everyone has given some really good advice. One thing I want to stress is to not worry about the quality during the first draft. Just sit down and get something on paper. You can always go back and edit it later anyways. Motivation is way more important than inspiration, and you have to be able and willing to work even if you don't want to.

Edit: I nearly forgot the most important bit. Have fun! And good luck of course.

Edited by LittleLamb121
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I've been writing on and off for about 4 years and I've only completed 2 books. Over the summer I plan to write and finish my 3rd book, as I'll graduate from University then.

 

You do not have to write everyday, if you feel you have to then you will not be interested in it.

 

Write for pleasure, not for anyone else.

 

Linked to my above point, write something that means something to you, write about a time you really remember and turn it into something beautiful.

 

I personally find that whilst I'm writing a lot I'll spend a lot of time outside and travelling and visiting new places for inspiration as well.

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