JoaLoft

The true story of Little Hope may be hiding a much deeper sinister truth ...[SPOILERS]

11 posts in this topic

My God... it all comes together now... lol now when I think of the game its no longer just "imaginary events." At least on a deeper level

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15 hours ago, JoaLoft said:

If you've ventured beyond the title of this post and you still want to read what I have to say about the story: you were warned.

 

If you haven't finished the game yet, stop reading and close this window. Major spoilers ahead!

 

I don't know if any of the following details I've uncovered have already been mentioned here on PSNP, but regardless: here we go. Before you ask: a lot of this is also based on actual collectibles you can find in the game. There's a TLDR paragraph down below if you really can't be bothered. But I urge you to read everything, all the same.

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Great post, congrats!

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On 13-11-2020 at 3:32 PM, rocam315 said:

Great post, congrats!

 

Thanks! Glad to see I've been able to enlighten some more players who finished the game and were initially disappointed with how it ended.

 

 

Definitely replay the game with this entire analysis in the back of your head, and you'll see that the game becomes more engrossing when you realize what it all means.

 

A few more cool details I noticed which I forgot to include in my main post:

 

- The game seems to start and end at the very same diner. And there's something else:

- In the opening scene, when Anthony carries the souls of John, Angela, Taylor and Daniel with him, the company name on the bus actually reads: "FERRYMAN". Whereas it reads "FARRIMAN" at the very end, once the souls have departed to the afterlife and his role has concluded. A very small detail, but of significant importance.

- If you pay attention to the bus when Anthony is driving before they get diverted to Little Hope, you can clearly see the four silhouettes of the other characters. Silhouettes, which signifies that they're entities which only Anthony can sense. Which is even further enhanced by the fact that these "passengers" are sitting up front close to Anthony, and yet Anthony is the only one clearly visible in the shot, and the passengers aren't. Spooky, right?

- In 1972, when Tanya returns home, she comments on their parents fighting, saying: "They're always fighting these days, getting predictable, LIKE A RECORD THAT KEEPS PLAYING OVER AND OVER." Gee, sound familiar?

- A little later in 1972, when Anthony talks to his adoptive father James about Megan, the dad responds: "You wanna try raising a family like this... THE DEVIL HIMSELF WOULD STRUGGLE WITH YOU GUYS..."

- The final chapter is aptly called "Full Circle" because that's the place where everything converges: the modern-day group following the little girl in the house, which is the same house from the house fire in 1972, and considering the time warps seem to align the locations in space (like the campfire), there is a very strong indication the house was built on the spot where the courthouse used to be. The very same courthouse where in 1692 (and the house in 1972) the doll or poppet caught fire through the Devil's manipulation and burned down the building. Quite intriguing, isn't it?

- One more thing I can add, but this is something you must've all deduced by now: the fact that their souls are being transported by Anthony, means that they are in limbo at that moment. Facing their demons alone and overcoming them grants them passage to the afterlife - or heaven. If their demons can stop them, they get dragged to hell. That's why each individual demon chases one specific person, and also why, even if they die due to other causes, the demons still claim them and drag them into the darkness, to hell. This is illustrated when Angela dies from the gunshot, and her chained demon still appears shortly after to claim her soul.

- There are even some more winks towards the reincarnations. Dennis (1972) says out of spite when his adoptive mother, Anne, tells him to clean up: "THINK SHE WAS A MARINE SERGEANT IN A PAST LIFE".

- Another similar instance occurs when Daniel and Taylor talk about how they're entering the museum. Taylor says: "YOU A BURGLAR IN YOUR SPARE TIME?" To which Daniel jokingly replies: "NO. BUT I WAS IN A PAST LIFE!"

- When Taylor wakes up from the bus crash, Andrew and Daniel notice she has ligature marks on her neck and ask if she got those from the crash. It is heavily hinted that the bruises on her neck are the wounds she suffered from being hanged in 2020, shortly before her soul ends up on the bus. (As far as I know, this only happens when you choose to have Tanya (1972) climb down the drainpipe, which is how she ends up dying by hanging, and how Tabitha gets executed in 1692.)

 

Little Hope is full of these cool details which help support my analysis. I can tell you, playing through it again and seeing everything click in a different way, makes it a lot more enjoyable. ;)

Edited by JoaLoft
So many small details to keep adding which point to the same conclusion! Lol
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Interesting interpretation. What are your thoughts then on Andrew hitting his head and losing his memories? He was ferrying the souls but never intended to take them to Little Hope? He genuinely lost his memories and was prevented from safely protecting the spirits as told?

I'll replay with this theory in mind (I have to for the trophies anyway) but I'm a huge fan of naturalistic explanations. I am heavily biased this way which may be affecting my interpretation of the game. My initial interpretation wasn't that Andrew was a Ferryman, but that he interpreted himself to be that way. That he felt he was carrying around the souls of his family with him, unable to let them go. By all of the characters facing their own demons, it was Andrew finally acknowledging they had their own agency too, and it wasn't all up to him to save them. By coming to this conclusion, he was able to finally let it go, and his company name appeared properly. I think he genuinely got confused by hitting his head, and it caused his memories to come back in super bizarre ways.

 

The one thing this idea doesn't account for well, which your theory does, is the reincarnations throughout time. We can say Andrew modernized the memory of his family a bit while he grew, but it wouldn't explain that statue of the author, which is the biggest thing pointing at a supernatural reincarnation explanation in my eyes. Why the witch trials if it's all in Andrew's head? Why the look alikes? I was interpreting the witch trials as a manifestation of Andrew trying to shift blame for the fire. He blamed Megan for the fire. He made her a witch in his eyes. By changing his interpretation of Mary's character in the witch trials, he was able to see the modern priest was the villain. The modern Priest, I believe, was sexually abusing Megan. He kept holding her late. The drawing, which you interpret to be of a demon or the devil, I saw as her conception of the priest in her life. She saw her family as not only incapable of helping her, but complicit in her suffering. Priests abusing children have been known to tell them things like they are corrupted, and their abuse is bringing salvation. Megan may have viewed herself as damned already, or captured by the devil. The devil whispering in her ear may have been simply her own interpretation of her whispering thoughts telling her to burn it all down. Megan deliberately burned down the house - but Andrew realizes she wasn't completely at fault, the priest was to blame as much as if not more than she was.

Note that before every flashback, we do not see things in the trials until we discover some modern clue that supports it - for example, we don't see the writing in the Priest's bible until we've seen that clue. In other words, Andrew, having grown up in and experienced the town, is familiar with its legends, and things he sees are incorporated into them. He's placed his family as stand-ins for the stories of old.  It is a way of him processing.

 

Every flashback involves spirits literally grabbing onto us - hard - and dragging us into that timeline. In fact, Andrew had a bruise from it. This fits pretty well with your theory about the spirits being real. You could also view it as being back in the town is very forcibly making Andrew confront his demons. Why, then, could he and the others interfere with the witch trials and cause it to look like supernatural events were occurring? I think this was to illustrate the fact that the past could not be changed - attempting to save the past incarnations was ultimately hopeless, and the witnesses further doubled down on their conviction to kill. Andrew - and the others - had to stop attempting to physically change the past - instead their power came in changing the interpretation of the past - ie convicting the priest as the true enemy instead of Mary which frees Andrew from hatred and misplaced blame and guilt, convincing their doubles to interpret things a certain way - note that only influencing Abraham makes meaningful and permanent changes to the past. The others ultimately don't matter. Abraham is Andrew.

 

Finally, my last argument for the 'all in Andrew's head' theory is specifically BECAUSE you can change the way Tanya died via Andrew's choices - and that changes the way her double died in the 1600's. Andrew's modern day agency changing the past makes 0 sense to me. Therefore, the 1600's spirit being strangled when Tanya is, and burned when Tanya is, with only Andrew being the difference, seems suspicious.

 

Thanks for making me think :) I'm curious what others think as well

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Hmm... for those interested in this topic, I strongly recommend reading the two 'secrets of little hope' comics. Not sure it gives a final answer but the first is basically JoaLoft's theory, the second lends a lot of credit to the 'all in the head' theory, and basically left me more confused about what the game was trying to communicate. Perhaps it tries to have it both ways, as the Curator's big thing is the story is ours to tell, ours to interpret, ours to decide what makes a happy ending.

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If the game wasn't so damn dark, maybe I could see some of these little details!

 

But that's a great theory. I'll keep it in mind when I play again.

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Wow, I'm glad I read this just now. After 3 playthroughs (just two more trophies to get) I thought I had a handle on what was going on, from supernatural shenanigans to mental illness and the processing of grief. But this just puts a whole new spin on everything I experienced. Awesome, thanks! 

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I just finished my first playthrough, so I haven't thought about it too much yet. My first thought at the ending was the movie "Identity." Since there are specific personality traits you have to unlock in order to save everyone at the end, it makes sense that this is all inside of his head and you have to inhabit every character to make them work together. It also finally makes sense for once in a Supermassive game why it keeps switching characters so frequently and interchangeably (since we are the true puppet master). But this "Ferryman" explanation gives an even deeper significance and makes it more interesting without disregarding any of the "imaginary" plot points. I like that both theories can exist at the same time, and I look forward to delving deeper in my replays. Decent story, but these trophy requirements are going to be a pain in the ass...

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Having finally earned the platinum across four playthroughs, I now have a completely different interpretation of events which lends more credence to the reincarnation theory. The very last trophy I earned was for the collectibles, and the final secret is automatically given to you at the end. When looking at the description of the Crude Doll, it states:

 

Quote

A doll made by someone with limited means that crudely resembles a poppet.

The materials of the crude poppet could be found in a prison cell.

Anthony spent a short time in prison after the fire.

 

When you start the game at the bus crash, the first collectible you find is a book on witchcraft that depicts the creation of the poppet. It seems clear to me that Anthony became obsessed with this idea (possibly in jail, while wracked with guilt) and crafted the poppet which allows him to look back in time and "manipulate" events in 1692 (whether this is all in his head or not, to atone for his guilt, is up to interpretation).

 

There are three main endings to the game, which also depict how at peace Anthony is with his decisions.

Worst ending: If you condemn Mary, she is burned at the stake and all your characters (split personalities, emotions, what have you) die.

Neutral ending: If you burn the poppet, the entire building burns down, mirroring the events of 1972. I believe this is the "canon" ending because this ties into the idea of reincarnation (doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past).

Good ending: If you accuse Carver, you absolve Mary and free her of her sins. This is what Anthony wishes he had done in his 1972 timeline (by paying more attention to Megan). Again, I think this is Anthony imagining the best case scenario and attempting to forgive himself for what happened in the fire. (As it fades out, you hear him say, "But I didn't save you...")

 

The Ferryman/Farriman connection is definitely there (the Curator also mentions it at one point), but I still believe this is Anthony dealing with his multiple personality disorder and attempting to "correct" the past by saving everyone in his mind. Or else, if you buy into the supernatural theory (via the collectibles in the game), then he definitely crafted the poppet and tapped into the past, but was still unable to change anything. Despite whichever ending you receive, it still doesn't bring any of his family back; it's more about coming to terms with his inner demons and gaining closure.

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On 5/12/2020 at 7:16 PM, KhajiitWerewolf said:

-snip-

 

On 9/6/2021 at 3:01 PM, bud-arc said:

-snip-

 

Sorry for cutting out both quotes, they were super long, haha. But I read them, and I remembered that I still wanted to reply to these comments.

 

There's certainly proof that it could all be psychological manifestations. To me though, a few things really stood out which is why I'm leaning more towards the supernatural theory:

 

- The whole Farriman (Ferryman) given and its mythological explanation.

- The dark figure with the claw-like hand in the prologue "guiding" the little girl to burn the doll and set the house on fire.

- The way in which the characters in the prologue die in eerily perfect timed fashion, if you look at how that cutscene is edited. So eerily perfect in fact, that there's no other way from my point of view than that some malicious supernatural entity is intervening and orchestrating their gruesome deaths. Tanya's death in particular stuck with me: the odds of her *accidentally* hanging herself by her scarf getting stuck on the balcony when she tries to climb down seem so incredibly small, that it's much more likely that the Devil had a hand in all their deaths.

- The music playing when all characters die in the prologue sounds menacing. Too menacing to be just sheer coincidence. I did some quick research: some of the tracks on the official soundtrack even have titles such as "Beyond Salvation" and "The Devil's Grasp".

 

Several details are definitely left open to interpretation, so I reckon this is perhaps a classic example of the "Schrödinger's Cat theory". Both explanations are in some way viable and they co-exist in parallel circumstances. Meaning that there is no canon explanation, and players are left to fill in the gaps themselves however they see fit.

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